Victimizations

How common are victimizations, and to whom are they reported?

In
2016
,
an estimated 16,028,538 victimizations occurred across
the United States
,
based on
nationally representative surveys
.
Of these, it’s estimated that 5,731,305 were
reported by victims to the police
.
Separately, according to the FBI, 7,919,035 serious offenses were
known to law enforcement
.

Compare
Victimizations reported to national survey takers
16,028,538
Victimizations reported to police
5,731,305
Crimes reported to the FBI
7,919,035

Interpreting victimization data

A primary purpose of the police is to prevent and solve crimes. Police can only address the crimes they are aware of, however, and, for a variety of reasons, many victims choose not to report their experiences to the police. By exploring various sources of victimization data, we can better understand the extent of crime in America and identify trends surrounding which crimes are reported to the police. The victimization data featured on this page comes from two distinct data series: the Bureau of Justice Statistic’s National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), and the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report (UCR), both of which cover the national and regional levels, from 1993-2016. Notably, these data series employ different research methodologies and crime categories. NCVS, for example, generates its estimates based on nationally representative surveys of individuals and households, and does not include murder or arson-related offenses. UCR generates its estimates based on voluntarily reported offenses known data from the country’s 18,000+ police agencies, and includes all Part I offenses. For these reasons, homicide and arson crimes are excluded from both data series and only indirect comparisons are made across figures. Data are labeled as “not applicable” when relevant information was not collected in a given year, and “missing” when relevant information was collected but a location did not report it. By interacting on this page with a series of visualizations that explore trends across offense types, time, and place, users can learn more about victimization experiences and how these are reported to and logged by the police.

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In
the United States
from
1993-2016
,
the estimated of victimizations
reported to national surveyors
,
reported to the police according to these surveyors
,
and
known to law enforcement
varied.

Compare
  • Victimizations reported to national surveyors
  • Victimizations reported to the police, according to national surveyors
  • Offenses known to law enforcement

Rates of victimizations reported to national surveyors are calculated based on NCVS estimated total victimization volumes and U.S. Census population sizes. These figures are helpful in comparing relative trends across geographic units, and over time in instances where population sizes have changed. However, victimization rates should be interpreted with caution, as not all victims are residents of the place where they were victimized, and relatively few victimizations occur in populations aged 12 and younger, which may skew rates in places with particularly young populations. To learn more, see Data Sources and Methodology.

Rates of victimizations reported to the police are calculated based on NCVS estimated reported-to-the-police victimization volumes and U.S. Census population sizes. These figures are helpful in comparing relative trends across geographic units, and over time in instances where population sizes have changed. However, victimization rates should be interpreted with caution, as not all victims are residents of the place where they were victimized, and relatively few victimizations occur in populations aged 12 and younger, which may skew rates in places with particularly young populations. To learn more, see Data Sources and Methodology.

Rates of victimizations reported to the FBI are calculated based on UCR estimated crime volumes and U.S. Census population sizes. These figures are helpful in comparing relative trends across geographic units, and over time in instances where population sizes have changed. However, victimization rates should be interpreted with caution, as not all victims are residents of the place where they were victimized, and relatively few victimizations occur in populations aged 12 and younger, which may skew rates in places with particularly young populations. To learn more, see Data Sources and Methodology.

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In
2016
,
the estimated of varied by geographic region.

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Victimization Rate

  • 0
  • 6,383.02
  • Data Missing
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